Challenge: Spotlight Health

Improving the Health and Well-being of 1.5 million Smallholder Farmers

Unilever’s supply chain includes 1.5 million smallholder farmers. The idea is to use our agricultural supply chain as a delivery channel to provide access to solutions such as water purifiers, improved cook stoves, solar lights, etc. to improve the health of these farmers and their families

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Challenge: Festival 1

No Lose Lottery for Solving the Last Mile Challenge of Solar Lamp Distribution

For over a decade “No Lose Lotteries” have encouraged poor Americans to adopt better saving habits. This same strategy can reduce the consumer cost and increase purchases of solar lamps in the developing world which will improve livelihoods and health while preserving the environment.

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Challenge: Festival 2

Peer to peer solar

According to NREL, only 22–28% of U.S. households could have solar on their own roof. What if the three-fourths of other Americans could get access to renewable power by buying it directly from other individuals? We are building an online platform to allow just that.

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Challenge: Festival 1

CrossBoundary Energy: unlocking Commercial & Industrial solar in Africa

Power in Africa is expensive and unreliable. Solar is a cheaper alternative, yet is inaccessible due to upfront cost and perceived risk. We remove both barriers by providing installers with financed Power Purchase Agreements to offer clients—unlocking clean energy-as-service for African enterprise.

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Challenge: Festival 2

Oasis: Distributed Utilities for Rural Development

Oasis is a cheap, replicable way to provide foundational services (clean water, solar-powered electricity, and digital communication) to rural settlements in developing countries. By collocating these services, Oasis becomes a hub where traditional rural economies can continue to thrive, while slowly introducing them to broader, global markets.

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